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  • Team RTDS Takes 1st Place at MYM2018!

    April 5, 2018

    Team RTDS wins 1st Place at the University of Manitoba’s Make Your Move Challenge!

     

    For the second consecutive year, RTDS Technologies joined the University of Manitoba’s Make Your Move challenge organised by WISE Kid-Netic Energy. Sixty grade 8 girls gathered at the University of Manitoba Engineering Atrium to design a device which will help a person with less mobility in their hands to grasp, let go, and move objects from one location to another, while also extending their reach by at least 30cm. Each team was mentored by a local female engineer and our Udeesha Samarasekera mentored the RTDS team of girls from Samuel Burland School! Udeesha loved their positive energy, teamwork, and determination as they narrowed down on their final design. Team RTDS received a total of 145 points landing them at 1st place with a whopping lead of 46 points!

    The success of the team boiled down to these four concepts:

    1. Getting a clear picture of the objectives and desired outcome: Team RTDS discussed the objectives and studied the objects that they had to pick up even before finalizing their first design!
    2. Designing with the end-user in mind: This device helps someone with less mobility in their hands. With enthusiasm, one of the girls said, “I only have to move my thumb to operate this device!” During lunch break, her face lit up as she easily picked up her pop can and took a sip!
    3. Keeping on schedule: Team RTDS aimed for simplicity which allowed them to have plenty of time for testing and re-design within the 1.5hr time limit.
    4. Testing and Re-design. Team RTDS based their design on successful devices such as kitchen tongs, and crucible tongs. The girls suggested that the end of the device should have a large surface area with the perimeter studded with hot-glue for gripping objects. In the testing phase, they saw that some objects slipped out of their grasp. They rushed back to add toothpick “teeth” along the perimeter which did the trick!

     

     

     The girls had lots of fun and learned important concepts from this design challenge! The event was held in conjunction with International Women’s Day to celebrate women’s achievements throughout history. We know that the girls in Team RTDS have a bright future ahead of them!

    RTDS Technologies Inc.
  • TWRT: Traveling Wave Relay Testing with the RTDS Simulator

    March 5, 2018

    RTDS Technologies makes waves with the world’s most robust tool for testing traveling wave protection devices in a closed loop

     

    The emergence of traveling wave line protection and fault location is a true breakthrough in the power industry, improving power system performance by increasing transient stability margins, increasing public and personnel safety, and limiting equipment wear and damage. The ultra-high-speed protective devices incorporating these techniques trip securely in a few milliseconds, record events in the MHz sampling rate range, and locate faults with unprecedented accuracy. With the release of our new TWRT functionality, the RTDS Simulator enables our users to comprehensively and flexibly test traveling wave protection devices in a closed loop.

    Features

    Accurately test traveling wave protection and fault location (found in the SEL-T400L) in a closed loop with the simulated power system

    The industry’s only tool with robust Frequency Dependent Phase Domain transmission line models operating at the necessary small timestep for traveling wave testing

    Multiple line segments represent physical transposition and allow fault modeling at multiple locations

    Why TWRT will be the world standard in traveling wave testing

     

    TWRT was developed by RTDS Technologies’ world-class power system protection experts. The tool and models involved have been specifically designed to accurately represent traveling wave attenuation and dispersion for proper performance analysis of traveling wave protection and fault locating. Robust and accurate models developed by applications specialists is what makes the RTDS Simulator the world standard for the closed-loop testing of protection and control equipment.

    Two hardware options for varying capabilities and budgets

    TWRT’s high-speed frequency dependent phase domain transmission line models can run directly on the powerful multicore processor-based NovaCor simulation hardware. This is a highly flexible and expandable option with the ability to simulate larger systems – for example, parallel line schemes.

    Using the dedicated GTFPGA Unit running the TWRT firmware allows for the high-speed simulation of frequency dependent phase domain transmission lines in parallel with the rest of the real time simulation running on main processing hardware. The GTFPGA Unit is a low-cost option that can be used in cases where small- or medium-sized systems are being simulated. GTFPGA-TWRT is directly interfaced with the small timestep simulation environment via a fibre cable.

    GTFPGA-TWRT is compatible with both NovaCor and PB5 processor card-based simulation hardware.

    Watch the TWRT launch video!

    RTDS Technologies Inc.
  • Hot Topic: PSCAD – RSCAD Conversion Tool

    December 21, 2017

    PSCAD to RSCAD Conversion Tool

    Want to SAVE TIME converting PSCAD cases to RSCAD for real time simulation? If your answer is “YES!”, then you’ll be excited to learn about our new feature, the PSCAD to RSCAD conversion tool, which was introduced in our latest software release, RSCAD v5.003.

    PSCAD to RSCAD conversion tool

    Some of the many features achieved within the tool are:

    • Translates single or multiple PSCAD (.pscx) files at once
    • Locate feature for error/warning messages: Opens the PSCAD case and locates the component of concern.
    • Change simulation parameters: rack number, time-step, nodes/network, naming entities
    • Graphical view: Easily move components within or between racks, and create multi-rack simulations!
    • View the transmission line/cable lengths to easily determine optimal locations for subsystem splitting.
    • View the number of nodes and loads for each hierarchy box
    • Create user-defined scripts to specify how PSCAD components are translated to RSCAD: ideal for new or custom components.

    In this quick video demonstration below, I’m going to show you how easy it is to convert a PSCAD case to RSCAD. Please note that this video does not demonstrate all the features of the tool. Please review the user guide within the conversion tool for more information.

     

    Download RSCADv5.003 to have access to this brand new feature along with several other new and exciting features: GPES, and PASuite!

    If you have any questions about the PSCAD to RSCAD conversion tool, please contact our support team support@rtds.com

    Author: Udeesha Samarasekera, December 2017

    RTDS Technologies Inc.
  • 2018 Training Courses

    December 19, 2017

     

    We recently announced the schedule for our spring 2018 training courses. Please visit our Training Course page for more information.

    Introductory RTDS Simulator Training Course ~ March 12 – 16, 2018
    Advanced Applications: Renewable Energy & Microgrids ~ March 19 – 23, 2018

     


    We’d love to hear from you! Is there a topic that you’d like to see covered in one of our Advanced Applications courses? Let us know!

    Complete this quick survey!

    RTDS Technologies Inc.
  • Hot Topic: Phase Domain Synchronous Machine with Internal Fault

    November 28, 2017

    Phase Domain Synchronous Machine with Internal Fault: _rtds_PDSM_FLT_v3

    A new phase domain synchronous machine model (_rtds_PDSM_FLT_v3) is available in the RSCAD library. Figure 1 shows the three-phase and single-phase view of the machine model.

    Figure 1: phase domain synchronous machine model (_rtds_PDSM_FLT_v3)

    Figure 1: phase domain synchronous machine model (_rtds_PDSM_FLT_v3)

    The phase domain feature of this model makes it capable of simulating synchronous machine internal faults. In order to do so, the self and mutual inductances of machine windings, including faulted windings, must be computed as functions of rotor position and saturation. In this approach, which is called “DQ−Based Method” in this document, it is assumed that not only the healthy windings create a perfect sinusoidally distributed magneto−motive force (MMF), but also, the MMF due to the faulted windings will be sinusoidal. The advantage of this method is that the users do not need to know the information about the distribution of the windings and rotor geometry, and the dq data required for utilizing the component ”lf_sharc_sld_MACV31” is adequate for utilizing this component as well.

    Like the other available phase domain synchronous machine model (rtds_PDSM_FLT_v3), this model is capable of simulation of the stator to ground faults. However, as Figure 2 shows, there are more capabilities in model v3 for simulation stator internal faults.  By selecting the proper choice of the fault, the user will be able to simulate different types of machine internal faults.

    The user may apply the following types of faults anywhere between 1% and 99% of the windings:

    • Turn-to-turn faults in individual phases
    • Turn-to-ground faults in individual phases
    • Phase-to-phase faults
    • Turn-to-turn faults in the field winding
    • Turn-to-ground faults in the field winding

     

    Figure 2: Comparison of the models v2 and v3 for internal stator faults capabilities.

    Figure 2: Comparison of the models v2 and v3 for internal stator faults capabilities.

     

    Note that the 1st and 2nd point of fault connection can be selected to be on different points of the winding. As an example, Figure 3 shows the percentage of the 1st and 2nd points of fault to be 50 and 30 percent of the winding from the neutral, respectively.

    Figure 3: Selecting of the position of faults on the stator winding

    Figure 3: Selecting of the position of faults on the stator winding

    Some examples of the fault analysis which are possible to perform with the faulted synchronous machine model “_rtds_PDSM_FLT_v3” are mentioned below:

    • Applying internal faults in all of the stator winding phases. Figure 4 shows an internal fault on phase C. Note that both CJ1 and CJ2 can be used for this aim.
    Figure 4: An internal fault on phase C of the stator winding

    Figure 4: An internal fault on phase C of the stator winding

     

    • Providing two fault point connections in each stator winding phase, this makes it possible to apply turn-to-turn faults in the same phase, by connecting these two connections together. Figure 5 shows a stator winding turn-to-turn fault on phase B.
    Figure 5: A turn-to-turn fault on phase B of the stator winding

    Figure 5: A turn-to-turn fault on phase B of the stator winding

    • Applying internal fault and turn-to-turn faults on the field winding, since two internal points of the field winding are available for connection. Figure 6 shows a turn-to-turn fault on the field winding. Note that, to see the external field connections, the field excitation type (parameter “fextyp” in General Model Configuration menu) should be set to “Power System Nodes”.
    Figure 6: A turn-to-turn fault on field winding

    Figure 6: A turn-to-turn fault on field winding

    • Applying internal phase to phase stator faults and phase to field faults Figure 7 shows an internal phase A to phase C stator fault.
    Figure 7: An internal phase A to phase C stator fault

    Figure 7: An internal phase A to phase C stator fault

    Should you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at support@rtds.com.

    Learn more!

    Author: Mayssam Amiri, November 2017

    RTDS Technologies Inc.